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Where We Once Belonged by Sia Figiel

  • 409 Want to read
  • ·
  • 70 Currently reading

Published by Kaya/Muae .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Modern fiction,
  • Literary,
  • Fiction,
  • Fiction - General,
  • General,
  • Fiction / Short Stories (single author)

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages247
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8702623M
ISBN 101885030274
ISBN 109781885030276

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In this book "Where You Once Belonged", we meet Jack Burdette, the small town football hero who returns after an 8 yr absence. He left under nefarious I feel a deep regret as I finish this book- this is the last book I will be able to read by one of the best authors ever.(I have read them all!)/5.   Where We Once Belonged satisfies on many different levels: It can be read as an adolescent girl's "coming of age" story, an intimate portrait of Samoa, or even a sociological examination of the lingering effects of colonization and pervasive cultural hegemony of Hollywood/5. The first novel by Sia Figiel, Where We Once Belonged draws on the author’s own experiences to paint a coming-of-age work about a Samoan teenager learning to navigate the complex rules of behavior expected of her as she matures into adulthood. First published in in New Zealand, where it won the prestigious Commonwealth Prize, the novel. Haruf manages this with just a few sentences, and we never see this character again. WHERE YOU ONCE BELONGED is a short book, only pages, and I was disappointed in the ending (It comes to an almost screeching halt), but I was so absorbed I read it in two days. I'm convinced that Haruf uses real people or composites to fashion these characters/5.

out of 5 stars The Bones We Once Belonged To awaken and reveal our transparent and empowered lives. Reviewed in the United States on Janu Verified Purchase. Judith Ansara's poems are authentic to the bone of how she lives life. No pretense. Simple Presence with the imperceptible and nuanced affordance of her, and therefore our 5/5(9).   Fiction. A bestseller in New Zealand and winner of the prestigious Commonwealth Prize, Sia Figiel's debut marks the first time a novel by a Samoan woman has been published in the United States. Figiel uses the traditional Samoan storytelling form of su'ifefiloi to talk back to Western Brand: Kaya/Muae. In Where You Once Belonged, the bestselling and award-winning novelist of Eventide, Kent Haruf tells of a small-town hero who is dealt an enviable hand--and cheats with all of the cards. Deftly plotted, defiantly honest, Where You Once Belonged sings the song of a wounded prairie community in a narrative with the earmarks of a modern American classic/5(). To Where We Once Belonged Colwyn Bay Revisited The story spans a century in the life of “this small, low profile but wonderful town”. Its fictional elements are rooted firmly in the fertile ground of diligently researched biographical material.5/5(3).

  ‘Where We Once Belonged’ is Sia Figiel’s debut novel. This coming-of-age story of a Samoan girl won the Commonwealth Writers' Prize for The Best First Book in the Southeast Asia and South Pacific Region. Summary Alofa Filiga is a typical teenager who tries to navigate her way through the transition from being a girl.   In Where You Once Belonged, the bestselling and award-winning novelist of Eventide, Kent Haruf tells of a small-town hero who is dealt an enviable hand--and cheats with all of the cards. Deftly plotted, defiantly honest, Where You Once Belonged sings the song of a wounded prairie community in a narrative with the earmarks of a modern American /5(5). We Once Belonged to the Sea book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers.5/5(1). Figiel uses the traditional Samoan storytelling form of su'ifefiloi to talk back to Western anthropological studies on Samoan women and culture. In doing so, she weaves an honest - and sometimes brutal - coming-of-age story that combines poetry with an unflinching humor to describe the abiguities of adolescent desire. Told in a series of linked episodes that recall the work of V.S. Naipaul and 2/5(1).